Connect with us

For Business

4 ex-Pilot Flying J workers get probation in fraud plot

Published

on

Headquartered in Knoxville, Pilot Flying J has more than 750 retail locations in 44 states, Roadside assistance available at over 135 locations nationwide and growing as part of its Truck Care program, 44 Goodyear Commercial Tire and Service Centers, and 34 Boss Shops.(Courtesy: PILOT FLYING J)

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.  — Four former account representatives from nation’s largest fuel retailer will serve probation for their roles in a plot to cheat trucking companies.

ex-Pilot Flying J employees Holly Radford, Lexie Holden, Janet Welch and Ashley Judd were sentenced Wednesday. They admitted to skewing the books to cover up the fraud prosecutors say was committed by their male bosses. Nearly 20 former workers were accused in the $56.5 million scheme.

The judge also ordered Radford, Welch and Judd to do community service. He exempted Holden because she works full-time and runs a business.

Prosecutors say the company lured trucking companies with discounts on fuel, then shortchanged them.

The Knoxville-based company is controlled by the family of Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and former Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

Jimmy Haslam has long contended he knew nothing about the fraud scheme. Gov. Bill Haslam said he was not active in company affairs.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

For Business

dexFreight names Justin Banon chief operating officers

Published

on

dexFreight is a decentralized, blockchain-based logistics platform that allows shippers, carriers and other supply chain stakeholders to transact and collaborate more efficiently, transparently and securely. (Courtesy: DEXFREIGHT)

SUNRISE, Fla. — dexFreight,  providers of a decentralized, blockchain-based logistics platform, has appointed blockchain academic and business leader Justin Banon  as its chief operating officer.

Banon has been a key advisor for dexFreight and has taken a lead role in the architecture of the company’s existing triple token model, and has collaborated in structuring the company’s business plan and soon-to-be-released rewards program, according to Hector Hernandez, dexFreight co-founder.

Justin Banon brings to dexFreight over 20 years of business leadership experience advising CEOs and boards of directors on how to scale disruptive ventures.

“Justin Banon brings to dexFreight a wealth of global business leadership experience including high growth business models, digital strategy and platform design,” Hernandez said. “He understands the complexity of token economics, loyalty programs and go-to-market strategies in a way that few executives can hope to, we are thrilled to have him on our team.”

Previously leading a global platform business that grew from $50 million to $1 billion in revenue through business model innovation, Banon brings to dexFreight over 20 years of business leadership experience advising CEOs and boards of directors on how to scale disruptive ventures.

In addition to his professional track record, Banon holds a bachelor’s degree in physics and a masters in innovation with a focus on network-effects business models and digital transformation.

Currently, he is completing a second masters degree in blockchain with a focus on token-powered network effects business models.

“dexFreight is a fantastic business set to disrupt and transform the logistics industry with a decentralized platform,” Banon said.  “I am excited at the opportunity to join the leadership team as we lead the business on its next stage of strategic development.”

dexFreight is a decentralized, blockchain-based logistics platform that allows shippers, carriers and other supply chain stakeholders to transact and collaborate more efficiently, transparently and securely.

For information, visit

 

Continue Reading

For Business

ACT Research says freight recession likely

Published

on

ACT says its Dashboard guidance at the end of 2018 suggests today’s order weakness will transition from “too much backlog” to an equipment supply-freight demand imbalance in the near future. (The Trucker file photo)

COLUMBUS, Ind.  – According to ACT Research’s (ACT) latest release of the North American Commercial Vehicle Outlook, a freight recession is not out of the question, but the easier call is a rate recession as truck supply-freight demand fall out of balance.

“While there is a very low probability and no expectation of an economy-wide recession in 2019, freight-related data points have been sufficiently bad in breadth and duration to note that a freight recession is possible, although unlikely,” said Kenny Vieth, ACT’s president and senior analyst. “That said, slower freight growth, an easing of driver supply constraints, the resumption of the long-run freight productivity trend, and strong Class 8 tractor fleet growth will increasingly pressure rates and by extension, trucker profitability in 2019.”

Regarding heavy vehicle demand, Vieth said the rolling-over of ACT’s Dashboard guidance at the end of 2018 suggests today’s order weakness will transition from “too much backlog” to an equipment supply-freight demand imbalance in the near future.

Despite his cautious tenor, Vieth said that the heavy commercial vehicle market continues to benefit from a still-broad spectrum of supply and demand-side triggers, including still-strong carrier profits, desirable new technologies, better fuel economy, and for trailers increased demand for drop-and-hook to keep drivers moving.

Regarding ACT’s medium duty forecasts, Vieth said preliminary February net orders were moderately above the current trend.

“Orders averaging 24,100 units per month for the past six months have diminished from the strong upward pressure they exerted on the forecast in the first half of 2018,” he said.

ACT Research is a publisher of commercial vehicle truck, trailer, and bus industry data, market analysis and forecasting services for the North American and China markets.

For more information, visit .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue Reading

For Business

Class 8 used truck sales volume drops in February

Published

on

Average prices for used Class 8 trucks in February were 15 percent higher than one year ago, according to ACT Research. (The Trucker file photo)

COLUMBUS, Ind. — Preliminary used Class 8 volumes (same dealer sales) declined moderately in February, falling 5 percent month-over-month thus erasing a portion of January’s 10 percent improvement, according to the latest preliminary release of the State of the Industry: U.S. Classes 3-8 Used Trucks published by ACT Research. However, the report indicated that longer-term comparisons yielded a 20 percent decline compared to February 2018.

Other data released in ACT’s preliminary report included year-over-year comparisons for February 2019, which showed that average prices rose 15 percent, while average miles contracted 5 percent, and average age was 3 percent higher.

“Generally, low inventory and strong demand increase price, while higher supply and softer demand tend to drive prices lower,” said Steve Tam, vice president at ACT Research. “The current pricing environment and dealer commentary suggest inventory remains one of, if not the main, limiting factor inhibiting sales volumes.”

ACT’s Classes 3-8 Used Truck Report provides data on the average selling price, miles, and age based on a sample of industry data. In addition, the report provides the average selling price for top-selling Class 8 models for each of the major truck OEMs — Freightliner (Daimler); Kenworth and Peterbilt (Paccar); International (Navistar); and Volvo and Mack (Volvo).

Continue Reading

Trending

https://babyforyou.org/en/surrogacy-and-emotions-how-to-prepare-the-baby-to-transferring/

Продать отруби в Хмельницкой области

www.ka4alka-ua.com