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Americans relocating to western, southern parts of country, United Van Lines survey shows

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ST. LOUIS — Americans are on the move, relocating to western and southern parts of the country.

The results of United Van Lines’ 42nd Annual Newsal Movers Study, which tracks customers’ state-to-state migration patterns over the past year, revealed that more residents moved out of New Jersey than any other state in 2018, with 66.8 percent of New Jersey moves being outbound.

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CAPTION FOR PHOTO

Courtesy: UNITED VAN LINES

This map shows inbound and outbound patterns for the United States in 2018. The dark blue indicates high inbound moving rates, the light blue medium inbound moving rates, the gray shows balanced states, the light yellow medium outbound moving rates and the dark yellow high outbound moving rates.

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The study also found that the state with the highest percentage of inbound migration was Vermont (72.6 percent), with 234 total moves. Oregon, which had 3,346 total moves, experienced the second highest percentage nationally, with 63.8 percent inbound moves.

States in the Mountain West and Pacific West regions, including Oregon, Idaho (62.4 percent), Nevada (61.8 percent), Washington (58.8 percent) and South Dakota (57 percent) continue to increase in popularity for inbound moves. In tune with this trend, Arizona (60.2 percent) joined the list of top 10 inbound states in 2018.

Several southern states also experienced high percentages of inbound migration, such as South Carolina (59.9 percent) and North Carolina (57 percent). United Van Lines determined the top reasons for moving south include job change (46.6 percent) and retirement (22.3 percent).

In the Northeast, however, an outbound moving trend continues. New Jersey (66.8 percent), Connecticut (62 percent) and New York (61.5 percent) were included among the top 10 outbound states for the fourth consecutive year. Midwestern states like Illinois (65.9 percent), Kansas (58.7 percent), Ohio (56.5 percent) and Iowa (55.5 percent) saw high outbound relocation as well.

“As the nation’s largest household goods mover, our study allows us to identify the most and least popular states for residential relocation throughout the country, year after year,” said Eily Cummings, director of corporate communications at United Van Lines. “These findings accurately reflect not only where Americans are moving to and from, but also the reasons why.”

Newsal Movers Study reveals the business data of inbound and outbound moves from 2018.

In addition to this study, United Van Lines also conducts a survey to find out more about the reasons behind these moves.

A leading motivation behind these migration patterns across all regions is a career change, as the survey showed approximately one out of every two people who moved in the past year moved for a new job or company transfer.

Other reasons for the high percentage of moves to the Mountain West in 2018 include retirement (28.1 percent), proximity to family (20.8 percent) and lifestyle change (19.4 percent).

Compared to all other states, Idaho saw the largest influx of new residents desiring a lifestyle change (25.95 percent), and more people flocked to New Mexico for retirement than any other state (42.74 percent).

“The data collected by United Van Lines aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates,” said Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Unlike a few decades ago, retirees are leaving California, instead choosing other states in the Pacific West and Mountain West. We’re also seeing young professionals migrating to vibrant, metropolitan economies, like Washington, D.C. and Seattle.”

The top inbound states of 2018 were (1) Vermont, (2) Oregon, (3) Idaho, (4) Nevada. (5) Arizona, (6) South Carolina, (7) Washington, (8) North Carolina, (9) South Dakota and (10) District of Columbia.

The top outbound states for 2018 were (1) New Jersey, (2) Illinois, (3) Connecticut, (4) New York, (5) Kansas, (6) Ohio, (7) Massachusetts, (8) Iowa, (9) Montana and (10) Michigan.

New Jersey (66.8 percent), which has ranked in the top 10 for the past 10 years, moved up one spot on the outbound list to No. 1. New additions to the 2018 top outbound list include Iowa (55.5 percent), Montana (55 percent) and Michigan (55 percent).

Balanced

In several states, the number of residents moving inbound was approximately the same as the number moving outbound. Arkansas and Mississippi are among these “balanced states.”

Since 1977, United Van Lines has annually tracked migration patterns on a state-by-state basis. The 2018 study is based on household moves handled by United within the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. and ranks states based off the inbound and outbound percentages of total moves in each state. United classifies states as “high inbound” if 55 percent or more of the moves are going into a state, “high outbound” if 55 percent or more moves were coming out of a state or “balanced” if the difference between inbound and outbound is negligible.

To view the entire 2018 study and an interactive map, click here.

 

 

 

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Schneider inducts 26 elite drivers into Haul of Fame for career achievements in safety

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Schneider officials said over 250 drivers were honored this year for outstanding accomplishments in safety. (Courtesy: SCHNEIDER)

GREEN BAY, Wis. — In recognition of those who live and embody its Safety First and Always core value, Schneider, among the nation’s largest truckload carriers, recently honored hundreds of its most accomplished drivers with awards celebrating career driving milestones.

Included in the esteemed awards were Haul of Fame inductions, Million Mile Driver Awards and Consecutive Safe Driving Year Awards.

The prestigious honor of induction into Schneider’s Haul of Fame is reserved for drivers who have accumulated at least 3 million safe driving miles and/or 20 consecutive years of safe driving without an accident. This year, 26 new inductees met these criteria, earning them membership alongside over 300 of Schneider’s elite drivers. Each inductee will have a commemorative plaque installed on the Haul of Fame wall at Schneider’s corporate headquarters in Green Bay.

“The honor and recognition these professional drivers have earned show that they truly exemplify our ‘Safety First and Always’ culture,” said Tom DiSalvi, vice president of safety, driver training and compliance at Schneider. “These outstanding drivers are the latest to contribute to a long history of safe driving, and we’re proud of the tradition they carry on through their achievements.”

The Million Mile Award is an honor earned by Schneider drivers who have transported freight over 1 million miles while remaining accident-free. This year, the number of drivers reaching million-mile safety marks is as follows:

  • 67 new 1-Million Mile Award winners
  • 42 new 2-Million Mile Award winners
  • 13 new 3-Million Mile Award winners
  • Three new 4-Million Mile Award winners

These new honorees have driven accident-free for the equivalent of 8,112 trips around the Earth’s equator. Through sleet and snow, across icy bridges and up winding mountain roads, Schneider drivers champion safety as their primary objective.

Additionally, Schneider recognized 113 drivers who have remained accident-free for 10 years and each five-year increment thereafter. This year’s Consecutive Safe Years Driving Award winners include:

  • 63 new 10-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honorees
  • 25 new 15-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honorees
  • 16 new 20-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honorees
  • Six new 25-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honorees
  • Two new 30-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honorees
  • One new 45-year Consecutive Safe Years Driving honoree

Throughout the year, Schneider hosted 14 award banquets to recognize the Haul of Fame inductees as well as drivers receiving the Million Mile Awards and Consecutive Safe Years Driving Awards.

Professional drivers who are interested in earning a spot in the Haul of Fame and are eager to make safety their top priority can learn about driving opportunities with Schneider by visiting schneiderjobs.com.

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Bison Transport’s Treana Moniz all business when it comes to trucking

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Women In Trucking’s May Member of the Month Treana Moniz may be the only professional truck driver who has hand-crocheted doilies adorning the seat backs in her cab and another covering her CB radio. They’re a constant reminder of family, mementos hand-made by her late grandmother. (Courtesy: WOMEN IN TRUCKING)

Treana Moniz loves her career as a professional driver. “I can’t think of anything that I’d be interested in doing, outside of trucking,” she said. She spoke with me from the cab of her doily-decorated Freightliner as she approached the Ambassador Bridge from the Detroit side. Since more than 25% of merchandise trade between the U.S. and Canada crosses the bridge, she’s no stranger to the crossing.

Moniz may be the only driver making the crossing with hand-crocheted doilies adorning the seat backs in her cab and another covering her CB radio. They’re a constant reminder of family, mementos hand-made by her late grandmother.

“I like old fashioned stuff,” she said, describing another family heirloom she cherishes. “I’ve got a tablecloth at home that she made for my mother,” she related. “She crocheted some beautiful things.”

Despite the touches of home in her truck, Moniz is all business when it comes to trucking. She’s earned a long list of accolades for her work behind the wheel and out of the cab as well. She’s currently a member of the2019-2020 Ontario Trucking Association’s Road Knights team and was selected as a Women in Trucking 2018 Canadian Image Team Member. She’s racked up several Driver of the Month awards at Winnipeg, Manitoba-based Bison Transport, as well as Eastern Company Driver of the year last year. And, she was Women in Trucking’s choice for May 2019 Member of the Month.

Career drivers often say that trucking is in their blood, and Moniz comes by hers honestly. Her grandfather hauled logs with horse teams and her father drove multiple types of trucks before her. Her grandmother, mother and an aunt all served drivers by working in truck stops as cooks and waitresses. For a while, Treana did too, but the call of the open road was strong. “Waitressing was a job,” she said. “Driving is a career.”

When she met the man who began her driver training, she left the apron and coffee pot behind to learn the trucking business. When the training was interrupted by a her then-boyfriend’s medical condition, she attended CDL school and got her license. After her friend recovered, they teamed together for five years. When that relationship ended, she took her career solo, ending up with Bison Transport after a short stint at another carrier. She’s nearly as passionate about Bison as she is about driving.

“They’re a great company,” she said. “My truck is spec’d for driver comfort, with an electric APU and a big inverter.” The inverter is important, because cooking is another talent of Moniz. “I love cooking,” she said. “I do my own cooking on the road, and when I get home, I’m the chief cook and bottle-washer.”

When she’s not at home cooking for her son, daughter and four grandchildren, she’s representing the industry, Bison and trucking women at events for the OTA, WIT and others. “As a road knight, I’ve been going out to the schools and talking to the kids,” she related. “They may not get into the career, but I hope they’re listening and they learn what women are capable of.”

Some of her educational efforts are to other drivers, too. She recently became a Driver Mentor at Bison, but she doesn’t have to be assigned a student – mentoree to offer help. “I have a lot of newer drivers that talk to me and get my advice,” she explained. “I let drivers know they can talk to me, they can lean on me.” She shares her knowledge with a down-to-earth approach that other drivers appreciate. “If you don’t understand how to do something, ask. I’m not here to judge, I’m here to help,” she explained.

Her personality is well-suited for talking to people. “I’m an outgoing person, I like meeting new people,” she explained. Then, an understatement, “I’m not shy.”

Whether she’s assisting new drivers, talking to school children or representing her gender at a WIT function, her intent remains the same. “I’m always planting those seeds to be safe,” she said. “I tell them to be safe out there, always stay alert and watch out the other person.”

What’s next in Moniz’ career? “I want that gold ring from Bison,” she said, referring to Bison’s gift for accumulating a million safe miles. “I’m over 700,000, and I want my millionth mile.

After that? “I’m not sure,” she answered. “If I ever quit driving, I’d like to get into the driver development or safety aspect of the industry.” Some might argue that she’s already pretty good at developing drivers and promoting safety, as well as representing with pride the women in the trucking industry.

“If I ever get out of trucking, I’ll probably spend time with the grandkids,” she concluded. There likely will not, however, be a lot of shopping. “I hate shopping,” she quipped. “Are you surprised?”

Whatever the future holds, Treana Moniz will undoubtedly approach it with the same determination and drive that earned her the selection as WIT’s Member of the Month. She’s happy to help anyone else get there, too.

 

 

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Eye on Trucking: Time to stop being childish and get down to work in D.C.

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When President Donald Trump goes on a road trip he navigates the freshly cut lawn and climbs aboard Marine One for a quick trip to Joint Base Andrews, where he climbs the stairs to Air Force One waiting for the door to close and then takes off down a silk smooth runway. Think about that next time you travel one of those bumpy interstate highways.(Associated Press: EVAN VUCCI)

When President Donald Trump goes on a road trip (other than to play golf on a Sunday when he ought to be in church), he leisurely strolls out of the White House (probably wearing a red tie), throws a few nuggets to a press corps intent for the most part on hearing something that will make their report the top story on the evening news or the lead story in tomorrow’s print editions (at least where they still exist), navigates the freshly cut lawn and climbs aboard Marine One for a quick trip to Joint Base Andrews where he climbs the stairs to Air Force One waiting for the door to close and then for a takeoff down a silk smooth runway.

Contrast that to this.

We decide to take a 45-minute drive to Hot Springs, Arkansas, for a nice lunch at a restaurant that has outdoor seating on Lake Hamilton.

We head north on our subdivision (the street is nice and smooth because the subdivision is only a year or so old), turn onto Denny Road, where we dodge potholes for a mile or so (hoping no one is in the other lane), then eventually make a right on Kanis Road as we head toward Interstate 430, which will take us to Interstate 30, which will take us to U.S. Highway 270, which will take us into Hot Springs.

Just before we leave Kanis Road, we are subjected to a section of road that has to be the roughest in the U.S.

I-430 and I-30 through Benton are nice, but just on the other side of Benton we hit a stretch of I-30 where the right lanes have been beaten down by big rigs to the point that now even they cheat and move to the left lane.

Meanwhile, when he gets back in Washington, the it’s time for the president to meet with Congressional Democrats to further talk about a $2.2 trillion infrastructure package they so smilingly agreed to a couple of weeks ago.

The president is back from a smooth landing at JBA and the Democrats have ridden down Pennsylvania Avenue, which I’ll guarantee you has no bumps or bruises or potholes.

Once inside, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accused Mr. Trump of a coverup (who in Washington hasn’t covered something up, except maybe Jimmy Carter?) and Mr. Trump turned, took his bat and ball and went out into the Rose Garden to tell the press what happened.

How childish.

After the so-called meeting, Pelosi said she intended to pray for Mr. Trump following that surprise Rose Garden news conference where he demanded Democrats quit investigating him (how childish of them).

A lot of folks better pray for Mr. Trump, Pelosi and everyone in Washington who has anything to do with this partisan politics game that is preventing us from getting the roads and bridges that the general public richly deserves after sending their “offering” to Washington every paycheck.

It’s time for Washington to get down on its knees and then get up and do something about our infrastructure.

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If you don’t think things are bad, consider the fact that the length of America’s structurally deficient bridges, if placed end-to-end, would span nearly 1,100 miles, the distance between Chicago and Houston, a new examination of federal government data shows. And it’s a problem that hits close to home.

The American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) analysis of the recently-released U.S. Department of Transportation 2018 Newsal Bridge Inventory (NBI) database reveals 47,052 bridges are classified as structurally deficient and in poor condition.

Cars, trucks and school buses cross these compromised structures 178 million times every day, the data show.

Nearly 1,775 are on the Interstate Highway System.

The most traveled structurally deficient bridges are on parts of Route 101, Interstate 405 and Interstate 5 in California, where daily crossings are as high as 289,000 vehicles per day.

Although the number of structurally deficient bridges is down slightly compared to 2017, the pace of improvement has slowed to the lowest point since ARTBA began compiling this report five years ago.

States with the largest number of structurally deficient bridges are Iowa (4,675 bridges); Pennsylvania (3,770); Oklahoma (2,540); Illinois (2,273); Missouri (2,116); North Carolina (1,871); California (1,812); New York (1,757); Louisiana (1,678); and Mississippi (1,603).

Those with the most structurally deficient bridges as a percent of their total bridge inventory are Rhode Island (23 percent); West Virginia (19.8 percent); Iowa (19.3 percent); South Dakota (16.7 percent); Pennsylvania (16.5 percent); Maine (13.1 percent); Louisiana (13 percent), Puerto Rico (11.7 percent), Oklahoma (10.9 percent) and North Dakota (10.7 percent).

Remember those numbers next time you cross a bridge.

 

 

 

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