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Stay Metrics introduces new indicator for trends in early-stage driver turnover

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This chart shows that approximately 60 percent of the more than 3,000 drivers from 89 carriers hired in January 2018 did not make it one year with their carrier. (Courtesy: STAY METRICS)

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Stay Metrics, the leading provider of driver retention tools, has released a new indicator for trends in early-stage driver turnover.

The new Stay Days Table serves as a “survivor” chart that shows the number of drivers hired by carriers each month and the percentage remaining at specific milestones after their date of hire —30 days, 60 days, 90 days, etc.

This table allows Stay Metrics to follow specific cohorts of drivers and to show how well carriers are retaining them over time, according to Tim Hindes, Stay Metrics co-founder and CEO.

As the table makes clearer than previous models, early driver turnover is a massive, industry-wide problem, Hindes said, noting that approximately 60 percent of the more than 3,000 drivers from 89 carriers hired in January 2018 did not make it one year with their carrier.

Retention trends seem to have remained consistent throughout the year so similar results are expected for each month’s cohort.

Hindes said the statistics come at a time when the driver shortage is of critical concern to motor carriers.

According to the American Transportation Research Institute’s 2018 Top Industries survey, the driver shortage is the No. 1 issue faced by carriers.

Unsurprisingly, driver retention is also high at the No. 3 spot.

Together these concerns are causing significant problems for even the best carriers in the industry.

They work exceptionally hard to find drivers in today’s market. If 60 percent of these drivers leave within one year, the driver shortage is not just an issue; it is a crisis, Hindes said.

“We believe the new Stay Days Table demonstrates the depth and pervasiveness of the early driver turnover problem. Our clients consistently beat industry averages for overall retention and this is their Stay Days Table. It represents some of the best in the industry,” Hindes said. “With drivers leaving so early, the driver shortage cannot be effectively countered. Our current version shows data for 2018 and we plan to update the metric for 2019 and beyond to continue monitoring the industry’s progress.”

The Stay Days Table saw a slight increase in overall retention for drivers hired in September and later. One possible explanation is that these drivers wanted to avoid changing carriers during the holiday season, Hindes said, adding that the data from the next few months will show if these fourth quarter hires match other groups’ retention percentages when they hit later milestones.

 

 

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May Class 8 truck sales total 24,424, a 1.7% gain over April

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Western Star posted the largest month-over-month gain with a 24.6% increase in sales ini May compared to April. (Courtesy: DAIMLER TRUCKS NORTH AMERICA)

There were ups and oops when Wards Intelligence released data on the sale of new Class 8 trucks in May.

On the up side, 2019 marked the first time since the boom year of 2006 that total Class 8 sales topped the 100,000 mark after only five months of the year as May sales were up 27.2% over the same month last year.

On the oops side, the month-over-month gain of 1.7% followed more significant month-over-month gains of 15% in March and 5.2% in April.

In all, there were 24,424 Class 8 trucks sold in May, bringing the yearly total to 111,332 compared with 88,674 after five months in 2018, a 25.6% bump.

Four of the seven nameplates posted month-over-month gains in May topped by Western Star (24.6%) and Volvo (23.8%).

All seven were up when compared with May 2018, led by Peterbilt (46.5%) and Freightliner (40.8).

Year-to-date, International has the largest increase (36.2%) followed by Freightliner (34.3%).

 

 

FTR Trucking Conditions Index improves slightly in April, still in negative territory

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An FTR executive said it seemed good times in trucking might never end, "but here we are back down to earth." (The Trucker file photo)

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — FTR’s Trucking Conditions Index rebounded marginally in April to a -0.64 reading.

Conditions improved slightly from the previous month, but TCI remains in negative territory as the rate environment continues to soften.

Economic indicators linked to freight are generally weaker, and FTR expects that the index will remain in a narrow band of negative readings through 2019 and into the 2020 calendar year, FTR said.

Details of the April TCI are found in the June issue of FTR’s Trucking Update, published May 31. The ‘Notes by the Dashboard Light’ section in the current issue includes an updated analysis of the current trade situation and the impact it is having on freight. Along with the TCI and “Notes by the Dashboard Light,” the Trucking Update includes data and analysis on load volumes, the capacity environment, rates, costs, and the truck driver situation.

“Not that long ago, it seemed inconceivable that the good times in trucking would end, but here we are back down to earth,” said Avery Vise, vice president of trucking. “Growth in manufacturing — the most significant driver of trucking activity — has subsided, and residential construction remains stagnant. However, there are some near-term positives, such as lower diesel prices. Also, carriers are responding to flagging demand by ending their hiring spree, which could set the stage for firmer capacity utilization down the road.”

The Trucking Conditions Index tracks the changes representing five major conditions in the U.S. truck market. These conditions are: freight volumes, freight rates, fleet capacity, fuel price, and financing. The individual metrics are combined into a single index that tracks the market conditions that influence fleet behavior. A positive score represents good, optimistic conditions. Conversely, a negative score represents bad, pessimistic conditions. The index tells you the industry’s health at a glance. In life, running a fever is an indication of a health problem. It may not tell you exactly what’s wrong, but it alerts you to look deeper. Similarly, a reading well below zero on the FTR Trucking Conditions Index warns you of a problem, while readings high above zero spell opportunity. Readings near zero are consistent with a neutral operating environment, and double-digit readings (both up or down) are warning signs for significant operating changes.

FTR has served as the industry source for freight transportation forecasting in North America for the shipping, trucking, rail, intermodal, equipment and financial communities for over 30 years.

Our team of experts have over 250 years of combined experience in the transportation industry and leverage that knowledge to provide quantitative analysis with historical and modal-specific insights. The reports, data, commentary, and insights that FTR provides help our clients evaluate market risks, identify new opportunities, and make informed decisions.

For more information about the work of FTR, visit , follow on Twitter @ftrintel, or call (888) 988-1699, ext. 1.

 

 

Survey shows wellness trends within transportation industry

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In the Atlas survey, 33% of the participants had at least three out of five conditions, among which is hypertension. (©2019 FOTOSEARCH)

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. — In the third white paper in a series of research examining demographic and wellness trends within the transportation industry, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions reveals the correlation between certain physical and behavioral elements and the risks to employee health and wellness.

The newly released white paper titled Relationship between Demographics and Wellness in the Transportation Industry details the results of a five-year study of 15,165 drivers and non-drivers employed in terminals, warehouses, shops and offices..

Factors measured include body mass index (BMI), tobacco use, age and gender and how these factors impact driver and non-driver health.

The paper, an expansion of two previous papers in the series, outlines potential risk factors that contribute to health concerns facing drivers.

Findings in the paper include:

  • Increased risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Of the 15,165 participants who completed biometric screening, 33% had at least three out of five conditions involved with metabolic syndrome (MetS), which includes hypertension, high blood sugar, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Individuals who have a combination of three or more of these factors have an increased risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.
  • Increased percentage of MetS in younger drivers. Drivers between ages 40 and 59 years shared the same risks as their 60-plus year-old counterparts.
  • Tobacco use and drivers. Drivers are 130% more likely to smoke than their non-driver counterparts.
  • The need for targeted training/wellness programs. Addressing BMI as a medical condition, understanding health risks associated with aging, adopting smoking cessation programs, and targeting drivers for training/wellness programs can decrease development of MetS conditions and slow the rate at which MetS risks increase with age.

“Our goal with this paper is to inform health and safety professionals in the transportation industry on how to identify and prioritize higher-risk drivers,” said James Landsman, president of Atlas IPS. “In the white paper, we use the results of our analysis to identify and justify recommendations to help companies reduce risk exposure and ensure better employee health and wellness.”

To view the full Atlas white paper, titled Relationship between Demographics and Wellness in the Transportation Industry, visit .

 

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