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California governor seeks explanation for high gas prices

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California’s governor wants to know why gas prices are higher than in the rest of the country, blaming potential “inappropriate industry practices” rather than the state’s higher taxes and tougher environmental regulations.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom asked the California Energy Commission for an analysis of the state’s gas prices by May 15. California drivers were paying an average of $4.03 per gallon Tuesday, or $1.18 more than the national average, according to AAA.

The same differential can be seen with diesel prices. On Monday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s weekly roundup of fuel prices showed the price of diesel in California to be about 86 cents more expensive than the national average.

Higher taxes, along with a combination of tougher gas standards and environmental regulations, normally account for about 70 cents of that difference, said Gordon Schremp, a senior fuels specialist with the California Energy Commission. But the rest is a mystery.

In 2017, the state’s Petroleum Market Advisory Committee found that California has had “a continuous and significant unexplained differential compared to the rest of the country” since February 2015. That difference has cost Californians more than $17 billion, said Severin Borenstein, faculty director at the Energy Institute at the University of California, Berkeley’s business school.

In a letter to energy commission chairman David Hochschild, Newsom defended the state’s environmental standards, accusing critics of using the high prices to “undermine our clean air and safety standards.”

“Independent analysis suggests that an unaccounted-for price differential exists in California’s gas prices and that this price differential may stem in part from inappropriate industry practices,” Newsom wrote.

The commission agreed to do the price analysis but declined further comment.

Western States Petroleum Association President Catherine Reheis-Boyd noted that California’s gas prices have been scrutinized in dozens of government inquiries, “all of which concluded the dynamics of supply and demand are responsible for movements in the price of gasoline and diesel fuel.”

Spiking gas prices have caused headaches for California policymakers since the Legislature approved a 12-cent gas tax increase in 2016.

Last year, voters recalled a Democratic state senator who voted for the increase and replaced him with a Republican. But a statewide ballot initiative to repeal the higher tax failed with more than 56 percent of the vote.

As gas and diesel prices kept climbing, 19 state lawmakers in January asked Attorney General Xavier Becerra to investigate the “unexplained surcharge.”

“This mystery surcharge happens between the refinery and retail purchase by the consumer,” Democratic Assemblyman Marc Levine said. “This is a punitive, abusive practice that Californians are paying.”

But it’s unclear if Becerra’s office took any action. Representatives from his office on Tuesday would not confirm or deny an investigation.

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1 Comment

  1. Albert John

    April 29, 2019 at 10:05 am

    Perhaps it has something to do with the formula that the refineries have to adhere to to make compliant fuels for California air resource board. And combine your state’s exclusive fuel and sales taxes and they’re you have it

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Peterbilt Motors opens fifth technician institute campus

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Since launching in 2013, the Peterbilt Technician Institute program has graduated more than 600 factory-certified technicians and boasts a 95% placement rate at a Peterbilt service location. (Courtesy: PETERBILT MOTORS CO.)

DENTON, Texas — Peterbilt Motors Co. has opened the company’s fifth Peterbilt Technician Institute (PTI) campus in Rancho Cucamonga, California.

“The PTI program helps meet the Peterbilt dealer network’s growing demand for entry level qualified diesel technicians.  The unique value proposition for graduates of PTI is finding its graduates jobs that often turn into long-term careers,” said Brian Brooks, program manager for the Peterbilt Technician Institute.

“The 50% growth of the Peterbilt dealer network this decade ensures that there are plenty of long-term career opportunities with our dealers, many of which begin as a diesel technician. Through the Peterbilt Technician Institute, Peterbilt is educating the next generation of diesel technicians to deliver exceptional service and drive uptime for our customers,” added Peterbilt’s Technician Program Manager Curtis Crisp.

Since launching in 2013, the PTI program has graduated more than 600 factory-certified technicians and boasts a 95% placement rate at a Peterbilt service location.

Each PTI student earns 12 Peterbilt certifications as well as certifications for both the PACCAR MX-11 and MX-13 engines as they prepare for a career in the diesel industry. PTI is a collaborative program with Universal Technical Institute.

For more information about Peterbilt, visit www.peterbilt.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nebraska officer earns grand champion award for roadside inspection

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Courtesy: CVSA Sgt. Benjamin Schropfer of the Nebraska State Patrol has earned the 2019 Jimmy K. Ammons Grand Champion Award, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s highest honor for the commercial motor vehicle roadside inspector. (Courtesy: CVSA)

PITTSBURGH — Sgt. Benjamin Schropfer of the Nebraska State Patrol has earned the 2019 Jimmy K. Ammons Grand Champion Award, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s highest honor for the commercial motor vehicle roadside inspector.

After a week of in-depth training and intense competition, Schropfer received the award Saturday at the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC) here at a joint awards ceremony with the American Trucking Associations Newsal Truck Driving Championships and Newsal Step Van Driving Championships.

Every year since NAIC started 27 years ago, each jurisdiction from Canada, Mexico and the United States is eligible to send one inspector to represent their jurisdiction, receive valuable training and compete against other top inspectors for the ultimate title of NAIC Grand Champion.

This year, 51 commercial motor vehicle inspectors gathered in Pittsburgh, August 13-17 to compete at NAIC, the only event dedicated to testing, recognizing and awarding commercial motor vehicle inspector excellence.

Each contestant competes in six inspection categories. The competition includes a North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria exam as well as thorough assessments of each inspector’s knowledge and expertise by providing various identical vehicles from which contestants must identify regulatory violations and critical vehicle inspection item out-of-service conditions, all while being timed. Contestants are tested on real-world vehicle and driver inspection scenarios and must appropriately evaluate the situation and properly identify violations within the recreated roadside inspection scenario. Inspectors are tested on the out-of-service criteria, inspection procedures, hazardous materials/dangerous goods requirements, passenger carrier vehicles and more.

In addition to the NAIC Grand Champion Award, other notable awards were earned by this year’s competing inspectors.

The one inspector who scores the most points representing each of the three participating countries in the competition receives their country’s High Points Award.

The following High Points Awards were presented:

  • Sean McAlister High Points Canada Award: Brittany Linde, British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
  • High Points Mexico Award: Gustavo Ruiz Alvarado, Policía Federal
  • High Points United States Award: Benjamin Schropfer, Nebraska State Patrol

First, second and third place awards are given for the following inspection categories:

The North American Standard Hazardous Materials/Dangerous Goods and Cargo Tank/Bulk Packagings Inspection is an inspection of the requirements related to identifying hazardous materials/dangerous goods markings, labeling, placarding, packaging, identification, etc.

  • First Place: Brittany Linde, British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
  • Second Place: Michael Trautwein, local member, Houston Police Department
  • Third Place: Benjamin Schropfer, Nebraska State Patrol

The North American Standard Level I Inspection is the most commonly performed inspection. It is a 37-step procedure that includes an examination of driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness.

  • First Place: Delaney Malsbury, Alberta Justice and Solicitor General
  • Second Place: Benjamin Schropfer, Nebraska State Patrol
  • Third Place: Andrew James – Arkansas Highway Police

The Team Award is given to the team with the highest combined score. The team with the highest score this year was the Blue Team, led by team leader Joe Manning with Pennsylvania State Police. The Blue Team had the following members: Brittany Linde, British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure; Stanton Ishii, Hawaii Department of Transportation; Ryan Dahm, Iowa Department of Transportation; Herbert Bradley, Kansas Highway Patrol; Level Walley, Mississippi Department of Public Safety; Benjamin Schropfer, Nebraska State Patrol; Tommy Torok, South Dakota Highway Patrol; Jose Najera, Texas Department of Public Safety; and Vidal Zamora – U.S. DOT/FMCSA.

This year, NAIC contestants voted to present the John Youngblood Award of Excellence to Joshua Bradley with the Georgia Department of Public Safety. The John Youngblood Award of Excellence is an honor NAIC contestants bestow upon a fellow NAIC inspector who exemplifies high standards and unwavering dedication to the profession. It’s the only award that is awarded to one inspector by their peers. Inspectors vote for the inspector who exemplifies the spirit of cooperation, leadership, a professional image, a dedication to their profession, a positive attitude, organizational ability and congeniality.

“I started my CVSA career 16 years ago at the 2003 North American Inspectors Championship in Columbus, Ohio, so this competition is near and dear to my heart,” said CVSA President Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police. “I know firsthand what an honor it is to be selected by your agency to compete on behalf of your jurisdiction against the best of the best inspectors from across North America. Each competing inspector – whether they receive a trophy or not – leaves NAIC as a winner.”

In addition to the competitive events, each inspector receives hands-on training on the latest safety information, technology, standards and procedures, while sharing ideas, techniques and experiences with fellow inspectors. Since NAIC is co-located with ATA’s championship, certified inspectors and professional drivers are in an environment where they can interact with, learn from and support each other throughout the week.

NAIC was created to recognize roadside inspectors and enforcement personnel – the backbone of the commercial motor vehicle safety program in North America – and to promote uniformity of inspections through training and education.

Next year’s NAIC is scheduled for August 18-22, 2020, in Indianapolis.

 

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WIT’s Ellen Voie wins inaugural Cinderella to CEO of the Year honor

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Women In Trucking Association President Ellen Voie, left, accepts a copy of the book “From Cinderella to CEO, How to Master the 10 Lessons of Fairy Tales to Transform Your Work Life” from its author Cary Broussard. Voie was named the 2019 Cinderella to CEO of the Year. (Courtesy: WOMEN IN TRUCKING)

PLOVER, Wis. — Women In Trucking Association President and CEO Ellen Voie has been named the 2019 Cinderella to CEO of the Year — along with winning her award category “Climbing the Beanstalk” — for cultivating an innovative improvement to the workplace that creates inroads for women to achieve career goals and enhances work-life balance opportunities for all genders.

The Cinderella to CEO Awards recognize women who have overcome obstacles to change businesses, communities and industries for the better.

The inaugural awards, inspired by the book “From Cinderella to CEO, How to Master the 10 Lessons of Fairy Tales to Transform Your Work Life,” by Cary Broussard, honored 200 women across industries and communities who were nominated for the awards.

“Our goal is to accelerate the successes of women who have worked hard and helped others to also succeed by connecting them to opportunities and each other,” said Broussard, CEO of Broussard Global. “In 2030, women in the U.S. are expected to control 75 percent of the wealth in this country. We want the wealth to be in the good, caring hands of those who strive to make the world a better place.”

Nine category winners, including Voie, were recognized by a Cinderella to CEO panel of judges for their support of other women, their transformational ability to overcome obstacles and barriers, and their desire to motivate others to accomplish their dreams. Each award category is tied to a chapter in Broussard’s book.

“I am so honored to receive the very first Cinderella to CEO award, as there were hundreds of nominations featuring some amazing women who have done truly notable and altruistic projects,” Voie said. “I am especially thrilled to be recognized by an organization outside the trucking industry, which makes the award even more special.”

The Women In Trucking Association is a nonprofit association established to encourage the employment of women in the trucking industry, promote their accomplishments and minimize obstacles faced by women working in the trucking industry. Membership is not limited to women, as 17 percent of its members are men who support the mission.

 

 

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