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Women In Trucking names top women to watch in transportation

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Women In Trucking Association is a nonprofit association established to encourage the employment of women in the trucking industry, promote their accomplishments and minimize obstacles faced by women working in the trucking industry. (Courtesy: WOMEN IN TRUCKING)

PLOVER, Wis. — The Women In Trucking Association Monday released its second annual list of Top Women to Watch in Transportation.

The editorial staff of WIT’s Redefining the Road magazine selected these individuals for their significant career accomplishments in the past 12 to 18 months as well as their efforts to promote gender diversity.

“This year, we’ve identified 53 women who stand out as top performers in a field of highly qualified nominees,” said Brian Everett, group editorial director and publisher of Redefining the Road magazine. “They represent a diverse range of company types and a variety of roles and responsibilities, showcasing the many career opportunities for women in the transportation industry.”

The 2019 Top Women to Watch in Transportation work for motor carriers, third-party logistics companies, equipment manufacturers, retailer truck dealers, professional services companies, technology innovators, and private fleets. Their job functions include corporate management (23 percent), operations/safety (21 percent), sales/marketing (18 percent), human resources/talent management (13 percent), customer service (6 percent), engineering/product development (2 percent), and professional drivers (9 percent).

“It is exciting to see so many remarkable women not only pushing the envelope in their own careers but also supporting women around them,” said Ellen Voie, WIT president and CEO. “Celebrating the accomplishments of women in our industry is central to the mission of Women In Trucking, so we’re especially pleased to recognize these industry leaders.”

The 2019 Top Women to Watch in Transportation include Tina Albert, assistant plant manager, Peterbilt Motors Co.; Tami Allensworth, senior vice president, customer experience, J.B. Hunt Transport; Lisa Angara, enterprise architect manager, Navistar; Cathy Bauder, driver, owner-operator, Steven Davis Trucking; Courtnay Beckham, sales specialist, SelecTrucks of Atlanta/Peach State Trucks; Mona Beedle, founder, Trucking Angels for Christ; Josephine Berisha, senior vice president, global compensation and benefits, XPO Logistics; Tracy Bird, branch manager, Trimac Transportation Inc.; Melissa “Missy” Blair, program manager, Center for Transportation Training, Pima Community College; Donna Boesen, customer service leader, Veriha Trucking; Jennifer Braun, vice president, Kansas City operations, Trinity Logistics; Debra Brunton, group director, maintenance, Ryder; Angie Buchanan, vice president, operations, Melton Truck Lines; Cynthia Champion, transportation safety manager, Martin Transport Inc.; Dawn Cochran, professional driver, Old Dominion Freight Line; April Coolidge, driver/trainer, Walmart; Kelly Cargill Crow, external communications manager, FedEx Freight; Mezzalina “Lina” Dejongh, branch manager, Trimac Transportation; Shayne Fanning, B2B communication and events, Michelin North America Inc.; Shirley Foley, vice president, DTS Logistics, LLC; Kristen Forecki, vice president, operations, Convoy; Trish Garland, corporate vice president, strategic services, Estes Express Lines; Emma Gelacek, safety manager, Garner Trucking; Mary Ann Hudson, executive vice president, Bibby Transportation Finance, and Tracy Jahnel, controller, Sterling Transportation Services.

Also, Tamara Jalving, vice president, human resources, Holland; Tracy Jonas, operations manager, JX Enterprises Inc.; Chelsea Kendrick, customer education manager, KeepTruckin; Tina Lewis, director, legal services, TVC Pro-Driver; Mary Malone, vice president, business development, Stay Metrics; Krissy Manzano, senior director of sales, enterprise & mid-market team, KeepTruckin Inc.; Judy McTigue, assistant general manager–operations, Kenworth Truck Co.; Mackenzie Melton, recruiting manager, Garner Trucking; Melissa Nishan, vice president, driver recruiting, Epes Transport System; Katlin Owens, corporate communications manager, CFI; Jennifer Piatt, elite support and diversity manager, Stoops Freightliner; Jennifer Radcliffe, president, Insight Technology; and Michelle Richard, vice president, human resources, Saia LTL Freight.

Also, Erika Rios, retail sales consultant, Arrow Truck Sales; Amanda Rodriguez, account manager/regional sales consultant, Navistar; Jane Rosaasen, plant manager–Mount Holly Truck Manufacturing Plant, Daimler Trucks North America; Roxie Sanford, director, driver services, Winnipeg Motor Express; Crystal Sequin, vice president, distribution channel strategy, Navistar; Leah Shaver, chief operating officer, Newsal Transportation Institute; Shannon Spence, trailer sales representative, Stoops Freightliner–Quality Trailer; Amanda Thompson, vice president, human resources, U.S. Xpress; Melissa Tomlen, senior vice president, accountability and Performance, YRC Freight; Carianne Torrissi, partner, Goldberg Segalla; Sauny Tucker, vice president, Art Pape Transfer DBA/ Tucker Freight Lines; Connie Vaughn, government relations manager, McKee Foods Corp.; Elaine Weackler, customer service representative, Veriha Trucking; Megan Wells, director of employee services, Veriha Trucking; and Heather Wilson, chief communications officer, BMO Transportation Finance.

The women will be featured in the upcoming edition of WIT’s Redefining the Road magazine and online at www.womenintrucking.org/womentowatch2019.

Women In Trucking Association, Inc. is a nonprofit association established to encourage the employment of women in the trucking industry, promote their accomplishments and minimize obstacles faced by women working in the trucking industry. Membership is not limited to women, as 17 percent of its members are men who support the mission.

For more information, visit or call 888-464-9482.

 

 

 

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Spot rates, volumes stay firm after International Roadcheck

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Reefer markets with load-to-truck ratios above 20 to 1 last week included Tallahassee, Florida; Albuquerque, New Mexico, Amarillo, Texas; El Paso, Texas; and Lubbock, Texas. (Courtesy: DAT TRENDLINES)

PORTLAND, Ore. — The number of truck posts on the spot truckload freight market jumped 14% during the week ending June 16, said DAT Solutions, which operates the industry’s largest load board network.

The increase is in line with expectations following CVSA’s International Roadcheck, the annual enforcement initiative, which tends to have a dampening effect on available capacity.

With the number of load posts down 10% last week, load-to-truck ratios declined for all three equipment types.

Still, national average spot rates were above May averages, and van and refrigerated freight volumes were each up nearly 20% compared to the previous week.

Newsal average spot rates through June 16 were:

  • Van: $1.90/mile, 11 cents higher than the May average
  • Reefer: $2.26/mile, 11 cents higher
  • Flatbed: $2.32/mile, 4 cents higher

Van trends

The national average van load-to-truck ratio dipped from 3.8 to 3.0 and rates were lower on 61 of the top 100 van lanes by volume. However, several major van markets including Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta, and Chicago were up significantly in terms of available loads.

Demand was strong in the Southeast and West. The average outbound van rate from Memphis, Tennessee, was up 8 cents to $2.33/mile, as was Los Angeles at $2.31/mile. Van lanes with gains included:

  • Memphis to Columbus, Ohio, up 24 cents to $2.23/mile
  • Stockton, California., to Portland, Oregon, up 18 cents to $2.86/mile
  • Los Angeles to Seattle, up 15 cents to $2.72/mile
  • Charlotte to Buffalo, up 15 cents to $2.54/mile

It’s almost always good news when rates rise in both directions on lanes in the same region of the country, as they did on a handful of van lanes that connect Memphis, Charlotte, North Carolina, and Atlanta. Memphis to Charlotte paid $2.16/mile, up 6 cents, and Charlotte to Memphis paid $1.65, up 3 cents, for a roundtrip average of $1.91/mile. That’s up 9 cents compared to the previous week.

Even when rates dropped in one direction, the roundtrips improved over the previous week’s averages. Memphis to Atlanta went for $2.50, up 10 cents, but Atlanta to Memphis paid $1.86/mile, down 3 cents. The roundtrip average was $2.18, up 7 cents compared to the previous week.

Reefer trends

While the national average reefer load-to-truck ratio dropped from 6.4 to 4.5, volumes increased out of both California and Texas, signs that produce season is on. Average outbound reefer rates were higher in Sacramento, California ($2.76/mile), Ontario, California, ($2.80/mile), and Fresno, California ($2.46/mile) — three of the top four California markets (Los Angeles fell 2 cents to $2.93/mile).

Freight volumes were up more than 40% out of Nogales, Arizona, on the Mexico border. The largest reefer lane-rate increase was Nogales to Dallas, up 49 cents to $3.36/mile.

DAT Trendlines is a weekly snapshot of month-to-date national average rates from DAT RateView, which provides real-time reports on spot market and contract rates, as well as historical rate and capacity trends. The RateView database is comprised of more than $60 billion in freight payments. DAT load boards average 1.2 million load posts searched per business day.

For the latest spot market loads and rate information, visit and follow @LoadBoards on Twitter.

 

Cargo Transporters initiates Acres of Diamonds…Focus on Home Program

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With Acres of Diamonds…Focus on Home, Cargo Transporters makes it possible for drivers to get home in less time when their shift ends or to stay home for a few more hours before reporting to work. (Courtesy: CARGO TRANSPORTERS)

CLAREMONT, N.C. — Cargo Transporters, an asset-based transportation operation, Tuesday introduced its Acres of Diamonds…Focus on Home Program.

The new recruiting and retention initiative will allow drivers to be closer to home when they finish a shift or have downtime in their schedules, and to take part in community and company events, according to COO Jerry Sigmon Jr.

“Acres of Diamonds…Focus on Home is aimed at lowering our already low turnover rate of 42% because we believe that drivers who live in or near our terminal communities are more likely to stay with the company,” Sigmon said. “Just as importantly, the recruiting and retention campaign reflects our corporate culture that has always embraced the importance of focusing on home, family and community. By carrying that same way of thinking over to our drivers we know they will be more likely to stay with us.”

With Acres of Diamonds…Focus on Home, Sigmon said Cargo Transporters makes it possible for drivers to get home in less time when their shift ends or to stay home for a few more hours before reporting to work. In addition, if there is a schedule change or scheduled vehicle maintenance, drivers who live closer to a terminal can go home and relax with their families.

As part of the program, Cargo Transporters is offering a $2,500 bonus to any employee who refers a driver located near its terminal locations in Claremont, Rocky Mount and Charlotte, North Carolina.

The name Acres of Diamonds refers to a motivational lecture by Russell Conwell, a popular public speaker in the 1800s. The story is about the misfortunes of seeking opportunities elsewhere instead of focusing on your own backyard.

“Acres of Diamonds was mentioned by one of our drivers in an employee survey,” Sigmon said. “As soon as we heard its message about being open to the opportunities that are around us, we knew we needed to quit focusing on a national level and focus on hiring locally.”

Based in Claremont, North Carolina, Cargo Transporters, Inc is an asset-based, transportation operation with 48-state intrastate and interstate common and contract authority. Cargo Transporters operates a fleet of 525 trucks and 1,700 trailers, and employs over 700 people.

For more information, visit .

 

 

ATA truck tonnage index declines 6.1% in May

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ARLINGTON, Va. — American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decreased 6.1% in May after jumping 7% in April. In May, the index equaled 114 (2015=100) compared with 121.4 in April. “As expected, tonnage corrected in May from the surprising surge in April,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “The economy is still growing, but the recent volatility in truck tonnage fits with a broader economy that is showing more mixed signals. The good news is if you ignore recent highs and lows, tonnage appears to be leveling off, albeit at a high level.” April’s reading was revised down compared with our May press release. Compared with May 2018, the SA index increased 0.9%, the smallest year-over-year gain since April 2017. The not seasonally adjusted index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by the fleets before any seasonal adjustment, equaled 119.1 in May, 1.5% above April level (117.4). In calculating the index, 100 represents 2015. Trucking serves as a barometer of the U.S. economy, representing 70.2% of tonnage carried by all modes of domestic freight transportation, including manufactured and retail goods. Trucks hauled 10.77 billion tons of freight in 2017. Motor carriers collected $700.1 billion, or 79.3% of total revenue earned by all transport modes. ATA calculates the tonnage index based on surveys from its membership and has been doing so since the 1970s. This is a preliminary figure and subject to change in the final report issued around the 5th day of each month. The report includes month-to-month and year-over-year results, relevant economic comparisons, and key financial indicators. ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello said the drop in the tonnage index shows the economy is still growing, but the recent volatility in truck tonnage fits with a broader economy that is showing more mixed signals. (The Trucker file photo)

ARLINGTON, Va. — American Trucking Associations’ advanced seasonally adjusted (SA) For-Hire Truck Tonnage Index decreased 6.1% in May after jumping 7% in April. In May, the index equaled 114 (2015=100) compared with 121.4 in April.

“As expected, tonnage corrected in May from the surprising surge in April,” said ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello. “The economy is still growing, but the recent volatility in truck tonnage fits with a broader economy that is showing more mixed signals. The good news is if you ignore recent highs and lows, tonnage appears to be leveling off, albeit at a high level.”

April’s reading was revised down compared with our May press release.

Compared with May 2018, the SA index increased 0.9%, the smallest year-over-year gain since April 2017.

The not seasonally adjusted index, which represents the change in tonnage actually hauled by the fleets before any seasonal adjustment, equaled 119.1 in May, 1.5% above April level (117.4). In calculating the index, 100 represents 2015.

Trucking serves as a barometer of the U.S. economy, representing 70.2% of tonnage carried by all modes of domestic freight transportation, including manufactured and retail goods. Trucks hauled 10.77 billion tons of freight in 2017. Motor carriers collected $700.1 billion, or 79.3% of total revenue earned by all transport modes.

ATA calculates the tonnage index based on surveys from its membership and has been doing so since the 1970s. This is a preliminary figure and subject to change in the final report issued around the 5th day of each month. The report includes month-to-month and year-over-year results, relevant economic comparisons, and key financial indicators.

 

ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello said the drop in the tonnage index shows the economy is still growing, but the recent volatility in truck tonnage fits with a broader economy that is showing more mixed signals.

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